Sharing Space

TALK

Where

Immigration Museum
400 Flinders Street
Melbourne, Victoria, 3000
What's On

Join Dr Mridula Nath Chakraborty (Monash University) and Prof Anoma Pieris (University of Melbourne) from the Asian Australian Studies Research Network, as they explore the implications of sharing space, sharing words and sharing positions in an increasingly divided and divisive world.

At a time when the multifarious populations of the globe are more connected than ever and labels can connect as much as alienate, this panel attempts to understand how we can try to share and shape a common humanity.

The Asian Australian Studies Research Network (AASRN) is a network for academics, community researchers, and cultural workers who are interested in the area of Asian Australian studies, a growing field that investigates the cultures, politics and histories of those of Asian descent in Australia. Much of its work engages with the fields of diasporic Asian, transnational, and diversity studies.

Speakers:

Dr Mridula Nath Chakraborty is the National Convener of the Asian Australian Studies Research Network. She teaches and researches on postcolonial, diasporic-national literatures and cultures in English, and in translation, at the Monash Intercultural Lab, Monash University. Her monograph, Hotfooting Around Essentialism: the identity politics of postcolonial feminisms, is expected in 2020 (Anthem). Mridula contributes to cross-cultural advocacy and transnational literary-creative networks through her work as a core partner of South Asia Diaspora International Researchers’ Network (SADIRN) and as board member of Southern Crossings: Reimagining Australia, South Asia and the world. Mridula also curates the My Place, My Story community engagement project with Monash Council.

Anoma Pieris is a professor at the Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning at the University of Melbourne. She is author, most recently, of Sovereignty Space and Civil War in Sri Lanka: Porous Nation (2018) and the anthology Architecture on the Borderline: Boundary Politics and Built Space (2019).

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